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Lowes in Holmdel Township, New Jersey - Unacceptable service..run around.

Update by user Nov 03, 2018

I believed they have violated the Home Improvement Practice Regulations found in the New Jersey Administrative Code at N.J.A.C. 13:45A-16.1 et seq. In multiple instances.

Original review posted by user Nov 02, 2018

Warning Notice! Do not use Lowe’s service for anything at the Holmdel location. You will regret it. They use subcontractors who are not Lowe’s employees and Lowe’s has no control of their own subcontractors. They do not control over there own sales representatives who do not follow through on what they say. I am also investigating the Lowe’s company policy and on home improvement and whether the violation the Home Improvement Practice Regulations below and consumer protection laws. I believed they have violated the Home Improvement Practice Regulations found in the New Jersey Administrative Code at N.J.A.C. 13:45A-16.1 et seq. In multiple instances. (See below for details) The requirements of the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, N.J.S.A. 56:8-1 et seq. (the “Act”) and the Home Improvement Practice Regulations found in the New Jersey Administrative Code at N.J.A.C. 13:45A-16.1 et seq. (the “Regulations”), place obligations on contractors and protect consumers when it comes to home improvements. Contractors should be aware of these provisions in view of the potential costs of non-compliance, and homeowners should familiarize themselves with these provisions prior to undertaking home improvements. Generally, the Act protects consumers from unconscionable commercial practices such as fraud, misrepresentation, and deception by persons involved in the sale of goods and services, including home improvement contracts. The Act defines contractors as persons engaged in the business of making or selling home improvements, and requires all contractors to be registered with the State of New Jersey. Contractors doing home improvements, defined as all construction work that is not construction of a new residence, are also subject to the home improvement practices regulations. Contractors must comply with the Act and the Regulations, or risk costly litigation and monetary penalties. In many cases, a violation of the Regulations, such as failure to provide a written contract, constitutes a per se violation of the Act and may subject the contractor to triple damages under the Act. The home improvement contract between the seller/contractor and the consumer/homeowner sets forth the rights and obligations of the parties with respect to the home improvements being performed. Pursuant to the Regulations, all home improvement contracts in excess of $500, and all change orders of such contracts, must be in writing and signed by the parties. Failure of the contractor to provide a written contract or change order is automatically a violation of the Act, and the homeowner need not prove that the contractor intended to violate the Act. Under the Regulations, the written contract must clearly and accurately, and in understandable language, set forth the terms and conditions of the contract, including the following: A detailed description of the work to be done and materials to be used. · A start date and an end date. · The total price to be paid by the homeowner, including finance charges. · The legal name and business address of the seller or agent who negotiated the contract for the seller. · A description of any mortgage or security interest to be taken in connection with the sale or financing of the home improvements. · A statement of any guarantee or warranty with regard to products, materials, labor and services made by the contractor.
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7 comments
Anonymous
#1591757

Most likely a fake review. The poster doesn’t give us any kind of grievance or damages they suffered.

Not even a basic outline of thier ordeal. Just an accusation with no detail to back it up.

Anonymous
#1591732

Lowe's is protected by the contract you signed. The third party contractor who did the work is who is liable for this, not Lowe's.

You can try to sue them if you wish, but it won't hold up in court because they have a signed contract absolving them from damages caused by the third party contractor. If you hire an attorney they will find this out pretty quickly.

Anonymous
#1591630

You can file a complaint with the NJ Consumer affairs. If The State looks at your evidence and finds that Lowe’s is non-compliant then they will impose fine on Lowe’s(the Contractor) of which the State receives.

Then perhaps Lowe’s will find it better to settle out of court with you for damages.

If the State finds that Lowe’s is compliant, They will serve as a mediator in resolving the dispute, and if you and Lowe’s can’t agree, then you will have to file a lawsuit against Lowe’s and let the court decide. Since you give no details exactly how Lowe’s has violated the state law, I would have to assume that they are compliant.

TroubledGiantClam852
#1591623

The notion that the biggest, most prosperous businesses are somehow immune from regulatory oversight is simply ludicrous. These powerful megacorps are just as susceptible to labor violations as their small and mid-sized counterparts.

Anonymous
#1591523

Good luck in Court.

TroubledGiantClam852
#1591576
@PCFL1592

No court for me.... New Jersey state law violation. NJState vs Lowe’s

TroubledGiantClam852
#1591582
@TroubledGiantClam852

Or hopefully corporate Lowe’s tight up policy to existing New Jersey state law.

View more comments (6)
Review
#1392999 Review #1392999 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Service
Lowes Sales Representative
Reason of review
Lowe’s policy and whether the violated Nj law..Home Improvement Practice Regulations found in the New Jersey Administrative Code at N.J.A.C. 13:45A-16.1 et seq.
Loss
$100000
Preferred solution
Let the company propose a solution

Lowes in Manchester, New Hampshire - Delivery is never on time and never on that day .

We have been ordering home improvements products from Lowes but the delivery system is too bad. They call a day in advance about the delivery time and give a time span but are never on time. Many times they never come that day, when we call after waiting the entire day we are told the Lowes store was not ready with the product. They should first check with the store and then call the customer for the delivery day and time. The time span they give is very long so one has to keep waiting, the entire day for them and then they do not come and do not even call to tell that they won't be coming. This is not the first time, we are into construction and place many orders but now wee are fedup.
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Review
#1392983 Review #1392983 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Service
Lowes Delivery Service
Reason of review
Problem with delivery
Preferred solution
Let the company propose a solution

Lowes in Boston, Massachusetts - Horrible service

Went to Lowe's in Plainville, Ma and designed remodeled kitchen. They sent out someone to measure twice. Ordered cabinets in July, supposed to be completed by Oct. Kept coming up with excuses after Oct for not receiving - when finally arrived had to be sent back - some cabinets 3 or four times before correct. When installed they had measured wrong and blamed it on us. Finally got them all installed in April. Had to go through 6+ months without kitchen(holidays), since we had gutted it for Oct. delivery. contacted corporate headquarters, they would look into it - (we had paid up front $30,000 and signed contract in July that it would go to arbitration if need be.) Contacted No. Caroline better business bureau - they couldn't get anywhere with Lowe's either. Our only option was to sue - instead we just got someone else to complete the kitchen and continue to tell everyone we know what a lousy company Lowe's is. It was an expensive and nerve-wracking experience but will never set foot in a Lowe's again.
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2 comments
TroubledGiantClam852
#1591597

Let Lowe’s feel the pain on at a store level call Lowe's corporate Customer Care...at 1 800 445-6937. It will force the store manager to fill out report and also call you with in 24 hrs. Let Lowe’s corporate feel you pain and poor service Fill out complaint with the state, Attorney General's Office and Consumer Complaint and Consumer-Affairs Copy the same answer to Attorney General's Office | Consumer Complaint Massachusetts Attorney General's Office | Consumer Complaint https://www.mass.gov/how-to/file-a-consumer-complaint https://cedac.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Office-of-Consumer-Affairs-Guide-to-Home-Improvement-Contractors.pdf

h.kitchener
#1591465

Homeowners go to these big box stores all the time and do what you did---contract with them to purchase and have installed cabinets, etc. The problem is that you are never assured the people at Lowe's know what they are doing or whether their measurements are accurate.

Then, Lowe's subcontracts with who-knows-who to actually install the cabinets. When things go wrong, you have to complain to Lowe's and go thru many different people in order to try and fix the problem(s).

Best to avoid big box stores and go directly to a small cabinet retailer who has their own installers or find a local building contractor who does this kind of work. And, of course never pay in full before work starts and always hold back at least 50% of the cost until the work is completed to your satisfaction.

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Review
#1392891 Review #1392891 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Service
Lowes Kitchen Remodeling
Reason of review
Poor customer service
Featured

Lowes in Dallas, Texas - Damaged my home during delivery of refrigerator

1.0
Details
Lowes - Damaged my home during delivery of refrigerator
Lowes - Damaged my home during delivery of refrigerator
Lowe’s Home Improvement - I have called Lowes twice and am now sending an email. The service I received from Kimberly Brewer in your claims department is provoking. She is rude, talked over me, refused to transfer me to someone else more polite or could answer my questions and told me I had to work with her only! She then disconnected the call. I asked to speak with someone else 7 times. My home was damaged significantly by Lowe’s due to a faulty install that caused a water leak to occur for over a three week period. I have called Lowe’s all week. I also emailed them. When I didn’t respond. When they finally called me back a moment ago the lady was beyond rude and seemed irate that I called and left a total of three messages ( 2 phone calls and one email). She mocked my request to speak to you or anyone else who could provide polite assistance. I’m considering my legal options at this point. I also have asthma along with my child and the the wet Sheetrock reeks of mildew. This fact that there is documented water damage that has accumulated over a three week period is gross negligence at this point and adverse to my health. They would not call me back. I’m also considering having Lowe’s pick up this refrigerator and I will cancel the credit card. This is not the kind of service I expected from Lowe’s. I will be sharing this experience only via social media, I also plan to contact your corporate offices to file a complaint. Lastly, I am requesting to be assigned to another claims examiner. I don’t this or the above issues are unreasonable requests.
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4 comments
Anonymous
#1591730

Lowe's doesn't have employees that do installations. They contract it out to a third party.

That third party is who your complaint is against, which is probably why they aren't dealing with you. If you sue them, you will lose. You need to sue the company that actually did the installation.

It's in your contract. Read it.

Anonymous
#1687511
@Anonymous

You’re totally wrong! Those contractors are on a CONTRACT with Lowe’s to do The work, are paid by LOWES to do the install, therefore LOWES is responsible!

Anonymous
#1591344

Since you mentioned that you are considering your legal options, you do realize that Lowes will Only deal with your lawyer... correct?

Lowes Will Not deal with you.

You also realize that you will have to Pay your lawyer even if he/she decides Not to take on your case... correct?

BouncyCanaanDog
#1591364
@Anonymous

That’s fine. Thanks.

View more comments (3)
Review
#1392773 Review #1392773 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Service
Lowes Installation
Reason of review
Damaged or defective

Lowes unfair to worker

2.6
Details
lowes is UN fair and abusive to employees many of the employees that work at the store I work at have many years with lowes (I have more than 5 years with lowes ) and TO AVOID PAYING SENIOR EMPLOYEES THERE FAIR SALARY THEY CUT ALL OUR HOURS TO JUST 12 HOURS A WEEK IN THE HOPE WE WILL QUIT BECAUSE YOU CAN NOT LIVE ON 12 HOURS A WEEK (2 WEEK PAY CHECK LESS THAN 300 DOLLARS) INSTEAD OF LAYING SOME OFF AND HAVING TO PAY UNEMPLOYMENT THEY MAKE IT IMPOSSIBLE TO LIVE AND FORCE YOU TO QUIT ALL THE TIME LOWES IS HARING MANY NEW EMPLOYEES SO THE HAVE THE HOURS AVAILABLE BUT THEY CHOOSE TO FORCE OUT OLD EMPLOYEES GOD FORBID WE GET SENIORITY. DO NOT WORK FOR LOWES THEY WILL STAB YOU IN THE BACK PS THEY MAKE YOU COVER 2 OR 3 DEPARTMENTS AND THEN REPRIMAND YOU FOR NOT DOING ALL THE DUTIES 3 PEOPLE ARE SUPPOSED TO DO AND MANAGEMENT IS A OVER WORKED NON EXISTENT JOKE as back ground note in the 5 years i have worked at lowes I have called in sick 2 times and been late to work only 1 time and management tells me I am a great employee then they treat me and others like {{Redacted}}
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7 comments
PresentSunBear
#1738743

I know

Anonymous
#1592827

Face the facts, Look for a job elsewhere. You don't say what location you work at.

Is it one of the 50 they just announced they are closing?

Are they just going to follow the footsteps of Sears? I'd find a company that can afford to pay the people they hire and are growing rather than closing stores.

TroubledGiantClam852
#1591631

Lowes corporate... anonymous file a complaint https://secure.ethicspoint.com/domain/en/report_agreement.asp?termsid=15&key=g2cPLwEewcJBb36KJ5

TroubledGiantClam852
#1591620

Lowe’s was sued for a Penalty: $29,500,000, September 22, 2009 in California looking in to the case below and make sure they are adhered to local,states,federal law as I said in my above comment. Details of case below: Case ID: BC260702 Case Name: Cynthia Parris et al.

vs. Lowes HIW Inc. et al Court of Appeal, Second District, Division 7, California. Cynthia PARRIS et al., Petitioners, v.

The SUPERIOR COURT of Los Angeles County, Respondent, Lowe's H.I.W., Inc., Real Party in Interest. No. B164375. Decided: May 29, 2003 R.

Rex Parris Law Firm, R. Rex Parris, James S. Kostas, Lancaster; Marlin & Saltzman, Stanley D. Saltzman, Woodland Hills, Louis M.

Marlin, Anaheim; Mazursky & Schwartz, Arnold W. Schwartz and Mark D. Bradley for Petitioner. Littler Mendelson and Gregg C.

Sindici, San Diego, for Real Party in Interest. No appearance for Respondent. Cynthia Parris and Willie Lopez filed a lawsuit “on their own behalf and on behalf of all similarly situated” against Lowe's H.I.W., Inc., alleging violations of California's wage and hour laws regarding overtime compensation. Parris and Lopez thereafter moved (a) for leave to communicate with potential class members prior to class certification and for approval of the content of their proposed communication and (b) to compel discovery of the names and addresses of potential class members.

The trial court denied both motions. Parris and Lopez petitioned this court for a writ of mandate directing the trial court to reverse its orders, and we issued an order to show cause. Precertification communication with potential class members, like pre-filing communication, is constitutionally protected speech. A blanket requirement of judicial approval for such communications would constitute an impermissible prior restraint on speech.

Accordingly, Parris' and Lopez's motion for judicial approval of their proposed communications was unnecessary; and the trial court should have dismissed the motion on that ground, rather than denying it. The trial court also erred in denying Parris' and Lopez's discovery motion without expressly weighing the actual or potential abuse of the class action procedure that might be caused by permitting the discovery, on the one hand, against the rights of the parties, on the other hand. We therefore remand for a new hearing on that motion. FACTUAL AND PROCEDURAL BACKGROUND In their complaint, filed on October 29, 2001, 6 The putative class has not yet been certified.

Parris and Lopez moved in the trial court for an order permitting precertification notice to potential class members and for approval of the proposed notice and method of dissemination. The proposed notice, which was attached to the moving papers, contains the following information: A class action lawsuit has been filed on behalf of current and former Lowe's employees alleging Lowe's has failed to pay overtime compensation to certain of its hourly employees (a three paragraph description of plaintiffs' contentions and a one paragraph summary of Lowe's defense are also included); individuals who worked for Lowe's at any time since October 29, 1997 in an hourly position may be members of the proposed class; the attorneys for the plaintiffs in the lawsuit (who are identified in the proposed notice) wish to gather information from the recipients of the notice regarding the nature of their work at Lowe's, including any overtime they may have worked; recipients of the notice are under no obligation to contact plaintiffs' counsel; the attorneys for Lowe's (who are also identified in the proposed notice) or other representatives of Lowe's may also wish to discuss the case; recipients of the notice are under no obligation to provide information or to discuss the matter with attorneys for Lowe's or with any supervisor or manager at Lowe's; “[y]our employer may noretaliate against you in any manner for refusing to provide information”; and further information regarding the lawsuit is available at www.lowesovertimelawsuit.com, a website set up by plaintiffs' counsel. In support of their motion, Parris and Lopez relied on Atari, Inc. v.

Superior Court (1985) 166 Cal.App.3d 867, 212 Cal.Rptr. 773 (Atari ), which held precertification communication with potential class members is appropriate, with prior court approval, in the absence of a showing of actual or threatened abuse of the class action process. Parris and Lopez also moved to compel responses to interrogatories they had previously served, seeking the names and addresses of current and former Lowe's employees, potential class members who were to be the recipients of the proposed notice. Lowe's opposed the motions, arguing Parris and Lopez had not established a legitimate precertification need to communicate with potential class members or to discover their identities and personal information.

Lowe's also opposed the motion to compel on procedural grounds. After extensive briefing and a combined hearing on the two motions the trial court issued a minute order denying both motions without explanation or comment. Parris and Lopez filed a petition for writ of mandate on January 23, 2003. We issued an order to show cause on January 30, 2003.

Briefing was completed on April 1, 2003. At our request the parties have submitted supplemental letter briefs addressing whether precertification communications with potential class members constitutes speech protected by the First Amendment for which no prior court approval is necessary, consistent with federal and state constitutional restrictions on prior restraints of speech. DISCUSSION 1. Precertification Communication With Potential Class Members Is Speech Protected by the First Amendment and the California Constitution and Requires No Prior Court Approval A.

General Free Speech Principles i. The First Amendment “[A]s a general matter, ‘the First Amendment means that government has no power to restrict expression because of its meaning, its ideas, its subject matter, or its content.’ ” (Bolger v. Youngs Drug Products Corp. (1983) 463 U.S.

60, 65, 103 S.Ct. 2875, 77 L.Ed.2d 469 (Bolger ).) 1 “For noncommercial speech entitled to full First Amendment protection, a content-based regulation is valid under the First Amendment only if it can withstand strict scrutiny, which requires that the regulation be narrowly tailored (that is, the least restrictive means) to promote a compelling government interest. [Citations.]” (Kasky v. Nike, Inc.

(2002) 27 Cal.4th 939, 952, 119 Cal.Rptr.2d 296, 45 P.3d 243). The preferred place of freedom of speech in the pantheon of constitutional values cannot be overstated: The right to freedom of speech is “one of the cornerstones of our society.” (Hurvitz v. Hoefflin (2000) 84 Cal.App.4th 1232, 1241, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 558.) Uninhibited speech “is more than self-expression; it is the essence of self-government.” (Garrison v. Louisiana (1964) 379 U.S.

64, 74-75, 85 S.Ct. 209, 13 L.Ed.2d 125.) Under the First Amendment, however, commercial speech enjoys a more limited degree of protection. “[T]he [federal] Constitution accords less protection to commercial speech than to other constitutionally safeguarded forms of expression.” (Bolger, supra, 463 U.S. at pp.

64-65, 103 S.Ct. 2875.) Lawyer advertising falls in the category of constitutionally protected commercial speech. (Bates v. State Bar of Arizona (1977) 433 U.S.

350, 97 S.Ct. 2691, 53 L.Ed.2d 810.) 2 “Commercial speech doctrine, in the context of advertising for professional services, may be summarized generally as follows: Truthful advertising related to lawful activities is entitled to the protections of the First Amendment. But when the particular content or method of the advertising suggests that it is inherently misleading or when experience has proved that in fact such advertising is subject to abuse, the States may impose appropriate restrictions. Misleading advertising may be prohibited entirely.” (In re R.M.J.

(1982) 455 U.S. 191, 203, 102 S.Ct. 929, 71 L.Ed.2d 64.) “The First Amendment principles governing state regulation of lawyer solicitations for pecuniary gain are by now familiar: ‘Commercial speech that is not false or deceptive and does not concern unlawful activities ․ may be restricted only in the service of a substantial governmental interest, and only through means that directly advance that interest.’ [Citations.] Since state regulation of commercial speech ‘may extend only as far as the interest it serves,’ [citation] state rules that are designed to prevent the ‘potential for deception and confusion ․ may be no broader than reasonably necessary to prevent the’ perceived evil. [Citation.]” (Shapero v.

Kentucky Bar Assn. (1988) 486 U.S. 466, 472, 108 S.Ct. 1916, 100 L.Ed.2d 475.) ii.

The California Constitution In terms more expansive than the First Amendment, article I, section 2, subdivision (a) of the California Constitution guarantees, “Every person may freely speak, write and publish his or her sentiments on all subjects, being responsible for the abuse of this right. A law may not restrain or abridge liberty of speech or press.” The protection afforded speech by this provision is broader than that provided by the First Amendment. (Wilson v. Superior Court (1975) 13 Cal.3d 652, 658, 119 Cal.Rptr.

468, 532 P.2d 116 [state constitutional guarantee is “more definitive and inclusive than the First Amendment”]; Gerawan Farming, Inc. v. Lyons (2000) 24 Cal.4th 468, 493, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720 (Gerawan ).) Specifically, “article I's right to freedom of speech, unlike the First Amendment's, is ‘unlimited’ in scope. [Citations.] Whereas the First Amendment does not embrace all subjects, article I does indeed do so․” (Gerawan, at p.

493, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720.) “The wording of this section is terse and vigorous, and its meaning so plain that construction is not needed. The right of the citizen to freely speak, write, and publish his sentiments is unlimited, but he is responsible at the hands of the law for an abuse of that right. He shall have no censor over him to whom he must apply for permission to speak, write, or publish, but he shall be held accountable to the law for what he speaks, what he writes, and what he publishes. It is patent that this right to speak, write, and publish, cannot be abused until it is exercised, and before it is exercised there can be no responsibility.” (Dailey v.

Superior Court (1896) 112 Cal. 94, 97, 44 P. 458.) The state and federal Constitutions do not impose “different boundaries between the categories of commercial and noncommercial speech” (Nike, supra, 27 Cal.4th at pp. 959, 969, 119 Cal.Rptr.2d 296, 45 P.3d 243), and the state Constitution does not prohibit imposition of after-the-fact sanctions for misleading commercial advertising.

(Ibid.) But the Supreme Court in Gerawan held that within its “unlimited” scope, expressly embracing “all subjects,” California Constitution, article I's right to freedom of speech protects commercial speech, “at least in the form of truthful and nonmisleading messages about lawful products and services,” as fully as it does political and ideological speech. (Gerawan, supra, 24 Cal.4th at pp. 493-494, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720.) In Gerawan the California Supreme Court observed that the right to free speech is “put at risk both by prohibiting a speaker from funding speech that he otherwise would fund and also by compelling him to fund speech that he otherwise would not fund.” (Gerawan, supra, 24 Cal.4th at p. 491, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720.) Nonetheless, under the United States Supreme Court's commercial speech doctrine as applied in Glickman v.

Wileman Brothers & Elliott, Inc. (1997) 521 U.S. 457 [117 S.Ct. 2130, 138 L.Ed.2d 585], the Supreme Court held that the California Plum Marketing Program, which compels all plum producers to fund generic advertising about their product, does not violate the First Amendment rights of dissenting growers.

(Gerawan, at pp. 497-508, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720.) After surveying the development of the United States Supreme Court's commercial speech doctrine, as well as California's independent constitutional protection for the right to free speech, however, the Gerawan Court concluded there is no difference under the state Constitution between the protection provided political and ideological speech and commercial speech, at least with respect to truthful and nonmisleading messages about lawful products and services. (Gerawan, supra, 24 Cal.4th at pp. 493-494, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720.) Accordingly, without more, although valid under the First Amendment, under California Constitution, article I, it is not permissible to “compel[ ] one who engages in commercial speech to fund speech in the form of advertising that he would otherwise not.” (Id.

at pp. 509-510, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720.) The Court found the dissenting grower's complaint pleaded factual allegations that were sufficient to at least implicate its article I right to freedom of speech against the California Plum Marketing Program and remanded the case, which was before it following a judgment on the pleadings in favor of the Secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture, to the Court of Appeal to determine in the first instance whether a violation of the grower's article I right to freedom of speech had been established. (Id. at p.

517, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720.) 3 Writing for the Court in Gerawan, Justice Mosk recognized that its conclusions concerning the full protection for commercial speech afforded by the California Constitution “have not been anticipated completely and in their entirety in prior California judicial decisions. That is because article I' s free speech clause and commercial speech were not considered on their own terms in any of these prior decisions, but only, for example, through the distorting lens of the United States Supreme Court's commercial speech/noncommercial speech dichotomy in First Amendment jurisprudence.” 4 (Gerawan, supra, 24 Cal.4th at p. 497, fn. 6, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720.) B.

Atari and Howard Gunty In the only published decisions addressing the propriety of precertification notice to potential class members, two Courts of Appeal have upheld the role of the trial court in screening the content of the proposed notice and authorizing the communication only if the court determines “there is no specific impropriety.” (Atari, supra, 166 Cal.App.3d at pp. 870-871, 212 Cal.Rptr. 773; Howard Gunty Profit Sharing Plan v. Superior Court (2001) 88 Cal.App.4th 572, 575-576, 105 Cal.Rptr.2d 896 (Howard Gunty ).) In Howard Gunty Division Four of this court held leave of court was required before a notice could be sent to potential class members in order to identify a new class representative after the original class representative had been found inadequate.

(Id. at pp. 575-576, 105 Cal.Rptr.2d 896.) The court concluded the necessity to regulate class action proceedings trumped free speech concerns, holding: “Plaintiffs contend that since their communication with potential class members is protected commercial speech under the First Amendment, the only limitation is that it not be false, misleading, or deceptive. (See Shapero v.

Kentucky Bar Assn., supra, 486 U.S. at p. 472 [108 S.Ct. at p.1921].) We disagree.

In the context of a class action, it is the court's authority and duty to exercise control over the class action to protect the rights of all parties, and to prevent abuses which might undermine the proper administration of justice. (See Gulf Oil Co. v. Bernard [ (1981) ] 452 U.S.

[89,] 100-103 [101 S.Ct. at pp. 2200-2201], [68 L.Ed.2d 693].)” (Id. at p.

581, 105 Cal.Rptr.2d 896.) Accordingly, it held that precertification communications are properly subject to prior court approval: “Precertification communication carries the potential for abuse. Thus, any ‘order limiting communications between parties and potential class members should be based on a clear record and specific findings that reflect a weighing of the need for a limitation and the potential interference with the rights of the parties.’ [Citation.] The trial court should identify the potential abuses and weigh them against the rights of the parties under the circumstances. [Citation.]” (Howard Gunty, supra, 88 Cal.App.4th at p. 580, 105 Cal.Rptr.2d 896.) C.

Requiring Judicial Approval for Precertification Communications Constitutes an Impermissible Prior Restraint of Protected Speech We respectfully disagree with the free speech analysis of our colleagues in Division Four.5 The requirement of court approval for precertification communications is a classic example of a prior restraint on speech. (Southeastern Promotions, Ltd. v. Conrad (1975) 420 U.S.

546, 554, 95 S.Ct. 1239, 43 L.Ed.2d 448 [prior restraint on speech exists if in order to engage in protected speech, (1) advance approval of the government is required, (2) the approval depends on affirmative action by a government official and such action requires the exercise of judgment, and (3) the government official may render that judgment based on the content of the speech].) Although “[p]rior restraints are not unconstitutional per se ” (Southeastern Promotions, Ltd. v. Conrad, supra, 420 U.S.

at p. 558, 95 S.Ct. 1239), prior restraints have long been held presumptively unconstitutional. (See Bantam Books, Inc.

v. Sullivan (1963) 372 U.S. 58, 70, 83 S.Ct. 631, 9 L.Ed.2d 584.) “[P]rior restraints on speech and publication are the most serious and least tolerable infringement of First Amendment rights.” (Nebraska Press Assn.

v. Stuart (1976) 427 U.S. 539, 559, 96 S.Ct. 2791, 49 L.Ed.2d 683.) Prior restraints on speech are permissible only in certain narrow circumstances constituting “exceptional cases.” (Near v.

Minnesota (1931) 283 U.S. 697, 716, 51 S.Ct. 625, 75 L.Ed. 1357.) The party seeking to enjoin speech “thus carries a heavy burden of showing justification for the imposition of such a restraint.” (Organization for a Better Austin v.

Keefe (1971) 402 U.S. 415, 419, 91 S.Ct. 1575, 29 L.Ed.2d 1.) In a footnote in Va. Pharmacy Board v.

Va. Consumer Council (1976) 425 U.S. 748, 771-772, 96 S.Ct. 1817, 48 L.Ed.2d 346, footnote 24 the Supreme Court suggested the “hardy” qualities of commercial speech “may also make inapplicable the prohibition against prior restraints.” (See also Central Hudson Gas & Elec.

v. Public Serv. Comm'n (1980) 447 U.S. 557, 571, 100 S.Ct.

2343, 65 L.Ed.2d 341, fn. 13 [“We have observed that commercial speech is such a sturdy brand of expression that traditional prior restraint doctrine may not apply to it”]; but see New York Magazine v. Metropolitan Transp. Auth.

(2d Cir.1998) 136 F.3d 123 [applying traditional prior restraint principles to invalidate decision by transit authority to remove from sides of busses advertisements poking fun at New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani].) However the Supreme Court may ultimately resolve that issue in terms of First Amendment jurisprudence, under the California Constitution imposition of a prior restraint on commercial speech bears the same presumption of unconstitutionality and carries the same heavy burden of justification as does a prior restraint on other forms of protected expression. (Dailey v. Superior Court, supra, 112 Cal. at p.

97, 44 P. 458) [“this right to speak, write, and publish, cannot be abused until it is exercised”]; Gerawan, supra, 24 Cal.4th at pp. 513-514, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720 (Cal. Const., article I's free speech clause “does indeed grant a right against prior restraint․ But without any limitation thereto․ Likewise, that article I's free speech clause grants a freedom of speech against prior restraint [with respect to commercial speech] does not preclude a right against what we may call ‘prior compulsion.’ One does not speak freely when one is restrained from speaking.

But neither does one speak freely when one is compelled to speak” [fn. omitted].) To be sure, not all advance restrictions on speech are invalid prior restraints under the California Constitution. In Wilson v. Superior Court, supra, 13 Cal.3d at page 662, 119 Cal.Rptr.

468, 532 P.2d 116, the Court acknowledged that “an injunction restraining speech may issue in some circumstances to protect private rights [citation] or to prevent deceptive commercial practices [citation].” (Accord, Aguilar v. Avis Rent A Car System, Inc. (1999) 21 Cal.4th 121, 143, 87 Cal.Rptr.2d 132, 980 P.2d 846.) A generalized and abstract interest in the proper administration of justice or fear of potential abuse, however, does not warrant imposition of a blanket requirement of prior judicial approval for precertification communications with potential class members.6 In concluding that, absent specific evidence of abuse, an order prohibiting or limiting precertification communication with potential class members by the parties to a putative class action is an invalid prior restraint, we find persuasive the reasoning of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit, which has held an order “restricting communications by named plaintiffs and their counsel with actual and potential class members not formal parties to the suit ․ violated the First Amendment to the Constitution.” (Bernard v. Gulf Oil Co.

(5th Cir.1980) 619 F.2d 459, 463 (Bernard ), affirmed on other grounds sub nom. Gulf Oil Co. v. Bernard, 452 U.S.

89, 101 S.Ct. 2193, 68 L.Ed.2d 693.) The district court had issued an order stating in part, “all parties hereto and their counsel are forbidden directly or indirectly, orally or in writing, to communicate concerning such action with any potential or actual class member not a formal party to the action without the consent and approval of the proposed communication and proposed addressees by order of this Court.” (Id. at p. 464, fn.

4.) The order was based on suggestions contained in Wright & Miller, Manual for Complex Litigation, Part II, section 1.41 (1973 ed.), “a publication widely used by federal judges” (id. at p. 464), which recommended “that district courts adopt local rules imposing ‘in every potential and actual class action’ substantially the ban on communication that is here involved, and in the absence of a local rule [fn. omitted] impose the ban by an order entered promptly after the filing of any actual or potential class action.” (Id.

at p. 466.) A panel of the court of appeals initially upheld the order by a divided vote. (Bernard, supra, 619 F.2d at p. 463, citing Bernard v.

Gulf Oil Co. (5th Cir.1979) 596 F.2d 1249, vacated, 604 F.2d 449.) On rehearing in bank, the full court of appeals invalidated the order as an unconstitutional prior restraint. (619 F.2d at p. 467.) The court found “the order has the ‘immediate and irreversible’ effect of a prior restraint” (id.

at p. 471), that was not justified by “the interests of a civil litigant.” Rejecting the contention the order was necessary to prevent abuses of the class action process, the court held “the general presumption against prior restraints is not mitigated by a claim that the fair and orderly administration of justice is at stake.” (Id. at p. 474.) The Fifth Circuit recognized the oft-cited “potential abuse” in class action litigation, but emphasized that “[a]n exception to the constitutional principles limiting prior restraints cannot be constructed on the foundation of asserted potential abuses in class actions generally.

In the first place, the hypothesis that abuses occur with such frequency and impact that prophylactic judicial intervention is required must be examined with the same scrutiny as other factual hypotheses. Neither the Constitution nor the judge's duty of constitutional fact finding is subsumed by the application of the pejorative word ‘abuse.’ Not everything that tends to make a class action less convenient than ideal, or more difficult to manage, is an ‘abuse.’ The same is true of such activities as solicitation of clients, or funds, or community support, that may be constitutionally protected but, at lest to some, may appear only marginally ethical․ [¶] ․ [¶] In any event, the potential abuse rationale is at odds with the requirement that a prior restraint is only justified in exceptional circumstances and by a showing of direct, immediate and irreparable harm.” (Bernard, supra, 619 F.2d at pp. 475-476, fn. omitted.) 7 Because no judicial approval was needed for the proposed precertification communication with potential class members, Parris' and Lopez's motion for leave to engage in such communications was unnecessary and should have been dismissed by the trial court on that ground.

A trial court may rule on the propriety of precertification communications only if the opposing party seeks an injunction, protective order or other relief.8 If such a motion is brought, the trial court may impose restrictions on such communications only “by a showing of direct, immediate and irreparable harm.” (Bernard, supra, 619 F.2d at p. 476.) Broad-based assertions that a proposed informational notice is “unfair,” contains some inaccurate statements, or is presented in a misleading form are simply insufficient bases for imposition of judicial limitations on protected speech in the form of a prior restraint.9 Even then, any restrictions “ ‘must be narrowly drawn and cannot be upheld if reasonable alternatives are available having a lesser impact’ ” on the right to free speech. (Ibid.) Finally, “the restraint ‘must have been accomplished with procedural safeguards that reduce the danger of suppressing constitutionally protected speech.’ [Citation.]” (Id. at p.

477.) 2. Parris' and Lopez's Motion to Compel Discovery Must Be Remanded for a New Hearing and Balancing of the Potential for Abuse Against the Parties' Rights Parris and Lopez also moved to compel discovery of the names and addresses of potential class members and management personnel following Lowe's refusal to provide that information in response to interrogatories. Although parties are free to communicate with potential class members before class certification, when they seek to enlist the aid of the court in doing so, it is appropriate for the court to consider “the possibility of abuses in class-action litigation.” (See Gulf Oil Co. v.

Bernard, supra, 452 U.S. at p. 104, 101 S.Ct. 2193 [“We recognize the possibility of abuses in class-action litigation, and agree with petitioners that such abuses may implicate communications with potential class members”].) Although the balancing procedure described in Howard Gunty, supra, 88 Cal.App.4th 572, 580, 105 Cal.Rptr.2d 896, may not be used to justify a prior restraint of speech, in our view it is properly employed in ruling on discovery motions in aid of communications with potential class members.

Therefore, when ruling on Parris and Lopez's discovery motion, in addition to applying the normal rules governing discovery motions, the trial court must also expressly identify any potential abuses of the class action procedure that may be created if the discovery is permitted, and weigh the danger of such abuses against the rights of the parties under the circumstances. The record before us gives no indication the trial court engaged in the requisite balancing procedure, despite the urging of both parties that it do so. Accordingly, we remand the matter for the trial court to apply the proper standard in ruling on Parris and Lopez's discovery motion. (See Howard Gunty, supra, 88 Cal.App.4th at p.

580, 105 Cal.Rptr.2d 896 [remanding because trial court failed to identify potential abuses and weigh them against the rights of the parties].) In ruling on the motion the trial court is directed to prepare “a carefully crafted order demonstrating [its] weighing of any abuses or potential abuses against the rights of the parties, including potential class members, and the integrity of the litigation process.” (Id. at p. 581, 105 Cal.Rptr.2d 896.) DISPOSITION The order to show cause is discharged and the petition for writ of mandate is granted. The matter is remanded to the trial court with directions to vacate the orders denying petitioners' motions, and for further proceedings not inconsistent with this opinion.

Petitioners are to recover their costs. FOOTNOTES 1. The First Amendment's fundamental right to freedom of speech is fully protected by the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment from unwarranted restriction by state action. (McIntyre v.

Ohio Elections Comm'n (1995) 514 U.S. 334, 336, 115 S.Ct. 1511, 131 L.Ed.2d 426, fn. 1; Gitlow v.

New York (1925) 268 U.S. 652, 667, 45 S.Ct. 625, 69 L.Ed. 1138; Kasky v.

Nike, Inc. (2002) 27 Cal.4th 939, 952, 119 Cal.Rptr.2d 296, 45 P.3d 243.) 2. Although some aspects of the proposed communication with potential class members-for example, the description of the pending lawsuit and summary of employees' rights to overtime compensation under the Labor Code-would appear to fall outside the traditional definition of commercial speech, it is not unfair to construe the entire document, as does Lowe's, as an advertisement for the services of the plaintiffs' lawyers. 3.

On remand the Court of Appeal concluded the grower's right of free speech outweighed the asserted governmental interest in the California Plum Marketing Program and held that objecting plum growers and handlers were entitled to withhold the portion of their California Plum Marketing Board assessment allocated to advertising and other speech-related functions of the Board. Review was again granted, and the case is now pending before the Supreme Court. (Gerawan Farming, Inc. v.

Lyons, review granted March 20, 2002, S104019.) 4. As the first (and most recent) example of a prior decision that had not considered California Constitution, article I's free speech clause and commercial speech on their own terms, the Court cited Leoni v. State Bar (1985) 39 Cal.3d 609, 614, footnote 2, 217 Cal.Rptr. 423, 704 P.2d 183, which it described as “dealing with commercial speech under both article I's free speech clause and the First Amendment's, but, in effect, construing and applying only the First Amendment's free speech clause and not article I's.” (Gerawan, supra, 24 Cal.4th at p.

497, fn. 6, 101 Cal.Rptr.2d 470, 12 P.3d 720.) 5. The Atari court, which preceded Howard Gunty by 15 years, cited no authority in support of its holding that court approval is required before the parties to a purported class action may contact potential class members and expressly declined to consider whether the parties had a First Amendment right to communicate with such persons. (Atari, supra, 166 Cal.App.3d at p.

873, 212 Cal.Rptr. 773.) 6. When engaging in precertification communications, as is equally true with any communication with a prospective client, a member of the State Bar of California must comply with the requirements of rule 1-400 of the Rules of Professional Conduct and abide by its prohibitions on false, misleading and deceptive messages or face possible disciplinary action. In this regard, however, we disagree with the suggestion by Lowe's that the proposed communication at issue in this case constitutes a “solicitation” prohibited by rule 1-400(C).

Rule 1-400(A)(4) defines “communications” to include “unsolicited correspondence from a member or law firm directed to any person or entity.” Rule 1-400(B)(2) defines a “solicitation” as any communication “delivered in person or by telephone, or [¶] ․ directed by any means to a person known to the sender to be represented by counsel in a matter which is a subject of the communication.” (Rule 1-400(B)(2)(a)(b).) Rule 1-400(C) provides, “A solicitation shall not be made by or on behalf of a member or law firm to a prospective client with whom the member or law firm has no family or prior professional relationship, unless the solicitation is protected from abridgment by the Constitution of the United States or by the Constitution of the State of California.” (Italics added.) Because neither the proposed notice to class members nor the web site prepared by plaintiffs' counsel is to be “delivered in person or by telephone,” it is not prohibited by rule 1-400. 7. The in bank decision was reviewed by the Supreme Court in Gulf Oil Co. v.

Bernard (1981) 452 U.S. 89, 99, 101 S.Ct. 2193, 68 L.Ed.2d 693 (Gulf Oil ). The Supreme Court declined to reach the constitutional issue and affirmed the Fifth Circuit's ruling based on a finding the challenged order violated the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure.

However, the Supreme Court did not disapprove the Fifth Circuit's analysis. Indeed, it recognized the existence of constitutional concerns and stated, “Although we do not decide what standards are mandated by the First Amendment in this kind of case, we do observe that the order involved serious restraints on expression. This fact, at a minimum, counsels caution on the part of a district court in drafting such an order, and attention to whether the restraint is justified by a likelihood of serious abuses.” (Id. at pp.

103-104, 101 S.Ct. 2193.) 8. The proposed informational notice contains the legend, “This correspondence is being sent to you with the permission of the Superior Court. The granting of permission does not constitute an endorsement․” Just as Parris and Lopez were not obligated to seek court approval before communicating with potential class members, so too they are not entitled to seek the court's imprimatur for their notice.

9. Lowe's, for example, argues the proposed notice in this case is “substantively infirm” because Parris' and Lopez's contentions “are always placed ahead of the information and contentions of the defendants” and suggests requiring a “split page format.” Lowe's also argues the notice is misleading because it fails to include a sufficient nuanced discussion of the limits of the lawyer-client privilege as applied to conversations between potential class members and class counsel. These complaints fall far short of the demonstration of direct, immediate and irreparable harm required before a prior restraint on protected speech can be justified.

PERLUSS, P.J. We concur: JOHNSON, J., and MUNOZ (AURELIO), J.*

TroubledGiantClam852
#1591609

start a union Complain to shop steward if you have a union. If not start a union... contact you local union office even if you don’t have union and the will know the state/local laws or Look up the state laws and make sure managerment is adhered to local and state laws.

Anonymous
#1590968

That's life in today's retail world. To be competitive with the on-line stores and remain profitable they have to cut what they spend on payroll and you are experiencing the results.

Anonymous
#1590833

Wall of text that I cannot understand nor read. Please Stop shouting in all caps.

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Review
#1392015 Review #1392015 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Cons
  • Hierd as a 20 hour a week and only given12 hours a week
Reason of review
Work Experience or Job Application
Preferred solution
Let the company propose a solution
Tags
  • Do Not Work For Lowes

Lowes in Gautier, Mississippi - Refusal to rectify improperly installed flooring

16 months ago a subcontractor installed Stainmaster vinyl flooring at our beach cottage in Panama City Beach, FL. According to Stainmaster’s independent inspector the flooring was not installed according to manufacturers’ instructions. Lowe’s did come in 3 months ago to have the flooring ripped up and we thought to finally install new flooring properly. Guess what?!? They left the subfloor and refuse to make this $7,000 + purchase right! Will I ever use this company again! NO!!!!!!! 16 months and no use of our cottage!!!!
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TroubledGiantClam852
#1591600

Call Lowe's corporate. If you have not already.

The store answers to corporate so fill out a formal complaint with the online or verbal. I do verbally let them type it up Customer Care at 1 800 445-6937 Contact/ fill out form by state attorneys general, consumer affairs and Regulation See attached websites https://myfloridalegal.com https://www.freshfromflorida.com/Divisions-Offices/Consumer-Services?original_host=www.800helpfla.com/index.html http://www.myfloridalicense.com/contactus/ 2601 Blair Stone Road, Tallahassee FL 32399 :: Email: Customer Contact Center :: Customer Contact Center: 850.487.1395 http://www.myfloridalicense.com/contactus/ Below list examples EXAMPLES OF ISSUES WHICH MAY NOT BE WITHIN THE AUTHORITY OF THE DEPARTMENT INCLUDE: Some fee and price disputes Disagreements over contract terms Some quality of workmanship issues Some consumer problems with hotels and restaurants Maintenance of condominium common areas https://myfloridalegal.com Florida Attorney General’s hotline helps victims of any type of fraud or unfair trade practices get the assistance they need; toll-Free 1-866-966-7226.

Review
#1391685 Review #1391685 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Service
Lowes Flooring Installation
Reason of review
Bad quality

Lowes in Big Rapids, Michigan - Months later.....No one can even tell me when the door I purchased will be installed!

2.5
Details
NEVER EVER PURCHASE A DOOR TO BE INSTALLED BY LOWES! We ordered and PAID IN FULL (Big rapids, MI store) for a door to be installed MONTHS ago. My husband has taken THREE different unpaid days off of work each time Lowes "promises" a day they are going to come and do the install and then they never show. When I purchased the doors I made it clear I had company coming (they arrive in a day and a half, this Wed!) and was assured that the door would easily be installed by then...plenty of time. The door actually arrived in the Big Rapids store over a MONTH ago and there it sits today, uninstalled. Last week, for the millionth time(we are at the point of begging now), we were told someone would call us from the Lowes installation department. NO CALL AGAIN. So today I called and asked for the manager of the store. And get this....he doesn't speak to customers. Great manager you have there in Big Rapids Michigan! At least the manager of the door department was professional enough to take the call. And get this!!!!! NO they cannot tell us when the door will be installed. NO it will not be installed as they had assured us months ago. And now...get this...they want to send a new service installer, and CANNOT tells us when he would arrive, "sometime in the FUTURE" and here's the kicker, the door we already ordered, the one that is sitting at Lowes may not be acceptable to this new installer. We have called numerous times,we have driven into the store numerous times(35 minutes), we have begged over and over and over and here we are still WAITING. So today nobody from Lowes can even give us a date ANYTIME in the future when the door which was paid for MONTHS ago will be installed. I wish I would have kept right on driving to Menards and had them install the door. Now I have NO DOOR and they cannot even give me an idea of when it will be installed. So I won't have my new door, which I PAID FOR MONTHS AGO, but to all of you out there....Don't bother with Lowes. Those big signs that say they install. WELL THEY DON'T. Don't waste your time or your money.
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TroubledGiantClam852
#1591589

Call lowe's corporate office complaint department call 1-800-445-6937 If you don’t get results there call violated Call or fill out form below link submitted to the Attorney General's office (see below for link for MI) (New Complaints May Be Filed On-Line) https://secure.ag.state.mi.us/complaints/consumer File a written complaint with the Michigan Department of Licensing & Regulatory Affairs, Bureau of professional Licensing (for complaints against licensed contractors only). Complaint filing instructions and complaint form are available online.

If the contractor is not licensed and is required to be, contact the Bureau of Professional Licensing or your local authorities, because failure to obtain a license may constitute a violation of criminal law. If the contractor you hired is not required to be licensed, file a written complaint with Attorney General's Consumer Protection Division, and/or the Better Business Bureau.

Consumers may contact the Attorney General's Consumer Protection Division at: Consumer Protection Division P.O. Box 30213 Lansing, MI 48909 517-373-1140 Fax: 517-241-3771 Toll free: 877-765-8388 Online complaint form

Anonymous
#1589815

The threat of driving to Menards and having them install the door is meaningless as Menards does not install anything. The problem with having a store like Lowes install a product for you is that they do not employ installers.

The subcontract with others to install the products they sell. They are obviously having a hard time finding someone to install your door.

You are always better off contacting a contractor on your own and making arrangements with them to do work on your home. That way you know exactly who will be working on your home and who to contact if you are having problems.

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Review
#1390798 Review #1390798 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Service
Lowes Door Installation
Reason of review
Order processing issue

Lowes in Downey, California - Bad customer service

2.7
Details
I ordered, and paid for a door at the Pico Rivera California store. A young man named Jorge was very helpful and knowledgeable. I decided that i wanted bronze hinges and door *** instead of satin nickel. When i tried to call, the operator answered giggling and transferred my call to millworks. Someone hung up the phone. I tried again and each time a young girl answers and told me when Jorge would be in. When i went in, a young girl comes out and tells me he's off. I try again the next day and a young girl tells me he opens in the morning. I called and a young girl tells me he is not scheduled for today. Lowes, please get rid of the young girls, they don't know anything and must think its time to visit with one another. And if the phone rings in one department why dosen't an employee who happens to be walking by answer it instead of letting it ring forever. It appears that the young girls are sabotaging the men's jobs. The men have families to support. The young girls have parents and boyfriends to support them. I will need to talk to the manager about the young girls rudeness. They talk in an authoritative manner and dont know nothing.
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1 comment
Anonymous
#1589422

What an ignorant view of the modern world.

Review
#1390589 Review #1390589 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Service
Lowes Customer Care
Reason of review
Poor customer service
Resolved

Resolved: Lowes in Fredericksburg, Virginia - Spotsylvania Lowe’s

3.2
Details
Thank you Dave. The Delivery Manager at the Spotsylvania Lowe’s for being such a jerk for the second time. You need to work on your customer service skills because you suck at them. You need training.I spoke to you twice on my deliveries, and the the way you spoke to me was so unprofessional. I tried to give those the benefit of the doubt when I bought a refrigerator for $1500 and it was damaged and I spoke to you and you just dismiss everything that I was trying to explain to you and was just extremely rude. I was able to speak to Bryce to handle this situation with I tried to give the is the benefit of the doubt when I bought a refrigerator for $1500 and it was damaged and I spoke to you and you just dismissed everything I was explaining to you. I try to give Lowes the benefit of the doubt and bought us though but a microwave for $1200 in the world. I spoke to you again you were extremely extremely rude about the situation. You do not need to be a manager at all.
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3 comments
Anonymous
#1594137

Is that anywhere near Transylvania?

TroubledGiantClam852
#1591604

Call Lowe's corporate...Customer Care at 1 800 445-6937 and let them know about you experience with Dave. I would also notify the store manger and regional manager.

To get to the store manager just call the store.

To get the regional manager ask for name from Customer Care at 1 800 445-6937 and also complain to them about your experience. #Let them feel the pain!

Anonymous
#1589024

What are you trying to say?

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Review
#1389954 Review #1389954 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Service
Lowes Manager
Reason of review
Poor customer service

Lowes in Kitchener, Ontario - Huge Disappointment!!!

I looked forward to Lowes taking over the local Rona because I thought it would mean better service and a higher level of staffing. I was wrong. While there are some good staff, most seem to be indifferent and and offer limited expertise. I expected to pay for better service but have found pricing to be ridiculous. The USA style of marketing means high prices for small items and a rash of sales gimmicks that are intended to mystify and confuse. I prefer honest and fair pricing on a regular basis. We hired arranged a renovation through Lowes and, despite being promised a top quality job by a Brian Baeumler approved contractor, we have been very disappointed. The store rep helped remedy some of our concerns but each time we look at the work, we get more upset. The reorganization of the store is confusing. It's hard to understand how the location of items was decided. One staff member suggested that the store is arranged to get customers to walk around searching. It would really help if the store would install a computerized product search. Considering the trade situation, I resent seeing products that proudly proclaim they are made in the USA. I know that we cannot always get items that are made in Canada but I would like stores in Canada to do their best at procuring local merchandise. It may mean a slightly longer trip but my future shopping will be at Canadian Tire and Home Hardware.
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Review
#1389703 Review #1389703 is a subjective opinion of poster.
Service
Lowes Customer Care
Reason of review
Overall performance